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CW 2011 Objectives
               
 
 
 
 

Cyberworlds are information worlds or communities created on cyberspace by collaborating participants either intentionally or spontaneously. As information worlds, they accumulate information regardless whether or not anyone is in, and they can be with or without 2D or 3D visual graphics appearance. The examples of such cyberworlds are communities created in different social networking services, 3D shared virtual environments, and multiplayer online games. Cyberworlds are closely related to the real world and have a serious impact on it. Cyberworlds have been created and applied in such areas as e-business, e-commerce, e-manufacturing, e-learning, e-medicine, and cultural heritage, etc. Cyberworlds augment and sometimes replace the real life and become a significant component of real economy. 

 

            CW 2011 Electronic Submission System is NOW OPEN

   
 Topics of interest

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Topics covered by CW 2011 include but are not limited to:

  • Shared virtual worlds
  • Virtual collaborative spaces
  • Shape modeling for cyberworlds
  • Virtual humans and avatars
  • Intelligent talking agents
  • Networked collaboration
  • Haptic interaction and rendering
  • Computer vision, augmented, mixed and virtual reality
  • Human-computer interfaces
  • Cognitive informatics
  • Brain-computer interfaces
  • Face and emotion recognition
  • E-learning in virtual collaborative spaces
  • Multi-user web games
  • Art in cyberspace, cyber-museums
  • Cyberworlds and their impact on society
  • Cyberethics and cyberlaws
  • Cybersecurity and biometrics
  • Data mining and warehousing in cyberworlds
  • Social networking

 

 Goals
 

 

Cyberworlds are information worlds or communities created on cyberspace by collaborating participants either intentionally or spontaneously. As information worlds, they accumulate information regardless whether or not anyone is in, and they can be with or without 2D or 3D visual graphics appearance. The examples of such cyberworlds are communities created in different social networking services, 3D shared virtual environments, and multiplayer online games. Cyberworlds are closely related to the real world and have a serious impact on it. Cyberworlds have been created and applied in such areas as e-business, e-commerce, e-manufacturing, e-learning, e-medicine, and cultural heritage, etc. Cyberworlds augment and sometimes replace the real life and become a significant component of real economy. lished by IEEE Computer Society and special issues published in The Visual Computer and other research journals

 
 

   
 Links to iCORE research
 

The goals of the CW are aligned nicely with the iCORE mandate to: “develop and support excellent university-based research teams around fundamental and applied problems in information and communications technology. Its (iCORE) goal is to build a critical mass of leading researchers in the fields of computer science, computer engineering, physics, mathematics and other ICT disciplines”. The areas of particular interest to iCORE, that are part of CW 2011, include Virtual Reality, Scientific Visualization, Computer Graphics, and their  applications in Engineering, Medicine, Biometrics, Games, Education and Arts. 

 

 

 Links to Alberta research
 

 In addition to the acknowledged academic research strength, there is a growing awareness of the value of computer graphics, virtual worlds and computer modeling for Alberta industry. New industrial research is being initiated in those areas, and significant activities spurred in many other industrial sectors, especially those involved in the acquisition, processing and interpretation of large data sets (e.g., geographical information systems (GIS), civil engineering, network optimization, e-commerce, games and education).